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NEGLECTED TROPICAL DISEASES

ELIMINATING A PUBLIC HEALTH PROBLEM BY 2020: SLEEPING SICKNESS

In 2001, Sanofi made a commitment to the World Health Organization (WHO) in the fight against sleeping sickness. In 2006, this collaboration was extended to other neglected tropical diseases. Over the period 2001-2016, Sanofi demonstrated its commitment through financial support amounting to $75 million, or $5 million per year. This includes the donation of drugs to treat diagnosed patients as well as the financing of outreach activities, mobile screening and infrastructure development. In 2016, the partnership with the WHO has been renewed. Since the beginning of this partnership, more than 34 million people have benefited from sleeping sickness screening and nearly 200,000 patients have been treated for the disease, which is almost always fatal in the absence of treatment. New reported cases fell from more than 26,000 in 2001 to fewer than 3,000 in 2015. This is the lowest number of new cases since a reliable record was set up 75 years ago. Screening actions are on going in order to reach the 2020 WHO goal of eliminating sleeping sickness as a public health problem.

Sleeping sickness, a public health issue.

SOLIDARITY

SANOFI ESPOIR FOUNDATION TO FIGHT HEALTHCARE INEQUALITIES

My Child Matters program in the Philippines.

Created in 2010 by the Sanofi Group to capitalize on its 20+ year commitment to international solidarity, Foundation Sanofi Espoir helps reduce healthcare inequalities among the most in need populations. The organization centers on the reduction of maternal and neonatal mortality, the fight against childhood cancer in developing countries and improving access to healthcare among the most vulnerable populations. This year, we have just celebrated the tenth anniversary of the My Child Matters program designed to help children with cancer in low-income countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America. In 2015, the Foundation supported 36 programs, allowing the medical care of more than 800,000 people and training of 2,900 healthcare workers in 31 countries.